How does a turbine work in a car? Types, problems, sound, cooling

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Turbo, biturbo, and twinturbo are synonyms of power and a smile on your face. In the past, turbochargers were installed in sports cars, mainly rally cars, and mainly diesel cars. Now manufacturers are reducing the size of engines more and more and turbines have become a kind of necessity for modern heavy cars to move more willingly.

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How does a turbine work in a car – introduction 

To understand how a turbine works, you need to use your imagination and move for a moment to the internal combustion engine. For the needs of today’s article, and to put it very simply, it can be said that the engine works like such a large pump, which sucks in air on one side and fuel on the other. Then the whole thing is compressed and ignition takes place. The right mixture of these two components explodes, setting in motion the pistons that drive the crankshaft. However, as you can probably guess, the exhaust fumes come from somewhere in the car. They are created by this explosion and are discharged from the engine into the exhaust system. For an engine to develop more power, it needs to burn more fuel faster. Bringing in more fuel is not a problem. However, fuel without additional air is useless, because as I mentioned before – the mixture must have the right composition (you will learn more about it in another article). The cylinders in the engine are limited in size and layout, so they are not able to increase suddenly and suck in additional air.

In the past, when car makers needed more air for the mixture, they simply built larger cylinders. This led to another problem – the engines had become large and heavy, requiring much more fuel or not fit for installation in vehicles.

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Jakub Markiewicz
Jakub Markiewiczhttps://jotem.in
Hi, I am the author of the Jotem.in blog and series of thematic portals since 2013. I have nearly 15 years of experience in working in the media, marketing, public relations and IT. If you are interested in cooperation, you would like me to write about something or test a product - let me know.
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